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July 2, 2019

Well, if you’ve been following me on social media, you’ve see that just shy of turning 17 weeks, Dan and I learned whether we would be adding two boys, two girls, or one of each to the mix.

We debated long and hard about whether or not to wait until their birth to find out. But, honestly, I’m going to have an ultrasound at least once a month. And, particularly for me being in the medical field, it would have been incredibly difficult NOT to figure it out. I also LOVE watching the ultrasounds and find them fascinating, so, wouldn’t want to shut my eyes the entire time. Haha!

Truth be told, about a week after we got the genetic testing results back, we decided to open the envelope which included the sex of the twins. We knew, however, that the only way we would know for sure at that point would be if it was XX, meaning two girls. The test indicated that a Y chromosome was present, meaning it could be 2 boys or 1 of each.

We weren’t sure how to tell our family, but, finally settled on buying confetti “blowers,” as my daughter called them. We decided to do it the weekend we would be with my parents, my sister (and her fam) at our family cabin!

I have to tell you, it was SO hard to wait that 48 hours to tell my fam, but we wanted to do it in a fun and exciting way.

The morning of the gender reveal was one of the best memories I've had in a long time.

We were 2 hours away from home at our cabin with my sister and her family & my parents. We set up a video call so that my two brothers and their families, Dan's two siblings and their families, and my in-laws could find out the sex of the babies TOGETHER. So from WA to CA to ID to Germany — they all tuned in live.

And, hilariously, my Mom’s didn’t go off LOL!

But, it was pretty clear to everyone that we will be adding a BOY and a GIRL to our family!

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